Science and Research
Science and Research

A+B Department orientation

The Department focuses on the following fields of study:
  • The principles of morphology, functional anatomy, kinesiology and biomechanics of human body structure and movement behaviour in normal, pathological and professionally stressful conditions
  • Methodological aspects of analysing human motion in sport and work, including adapted motions of a handicapped human
  • Tolerance of organism to mechanical stresses
  • Problems of bioengineering and sport engineering in relation to substitutes for and functional support of the motion system and to protective functions of outfits and equipment.

Research and scientific orientation of the A+B Department

Traditional subjects of core research include:
  • Complex structure of organism - Interstitial fluids as a medium of transmission and the mechanics of their transport
  • Biomechanics of the musculo-skeletal system. Phenomenon of muscular spasm and its rheology.
  • Spread of deforming forces in the human body as a result of impact loads.
  • Stability of body shape and problems of identifying the pattern of shape changes.
  • Muscular redundancy in the control of articular kinetics.
  • Analysis of human body motions. Problems of synthesis and animation.
Applications:
  • Biomechanics of the spine in relation to aetiology of vertebrogenic syndrome.
  • Problems of measuring muscular spasm as applied in physiotherapeutic diagnostics.
  • Mechanical interactions at the foot/surface interface. Problems with their detection and interpretation in relation to the structural and functional changes in the locomotion system.
  • Pregnancy and its effects on transfer of impacts and vibrations within the body (forensic focus).
  • Questions of applied ergonomics (analysis of stress processes; tolerance of the human organism to mechanic loads; possibilities for favourable changes from altered behaviour or the use of technical devices; biomechanical aspects of regeneration and repair).
  • Cranio-spinal and intracranial pathobiomechanics in relation to a sport and work traumatology.


© Jiří Tlapák, 2014